Equal Justice Under Law
 
— BACK TO PREVIOUS LOCATION —
About Bernofsky  Case Calendar  More Options

Conflict of Interest
Trips for Judges
The Case for Censure
Faculty Rights Coalition
Letter to Congress
Balance the Scales
Advice to Professors
Call for Judicial Reform

Send a message to Congress now!
Send a Message to Congress!

Recusal Statutes

According to the July, 1999 issue of The Third Branch, a monthly newsletter published by the Administrative Office of the United States Courts, the "Codes of Conduct" volume of the Guide to Judiciary Policies and Procedures is probably the most frequently consulted book in a judge's chambers, next to the federal and civil codes. In this book, the Committee on Codes of Conduct of the Judicial Conference of the United States offers the following standards for judges who are adjunct faculty at law schools:

"It is permissible for judges to teach in law schools.  However, ... the judge should not participate in any case in which the school or its employees are parties."

Guide to Judiciary Policies and Procedures, 1999 Ed., Vol. II, Chap. V, §4.1(b), at p. V-57.

"A judge who teaches at a law school should recuse from all cases involving that educational institution as party. The judge should recuse (or remit) from cases involving the university, as well as those involving the law school, where the judge's impartiality might reasonably be questioned in view of the size and cohesiveness of the university, the degree of independence of the law school, the nature of the case, and related factors. Similar factors govern recusal of judges serving on a university advisory board."

Guide to Judiciary Policies and Procedures, 1999 Ed., Vol. II, Chap. V, §3.4-3(a), at p. V-39.

Tulane University's modest size, cohesiveness, and proximity to the Federal District Court and Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals within the same urban locale are factors that contribute to the ethical necessity for recusal of Tulane Law School's adjunct faculty judges from cases in which the university is a party. Other legal considerations follow. In 2005, The Faculty Rights Coalition proposed that adjunct professor judges should agree, as a precondition of employment, not to hear cases that involve the institution where they teach.

 
United States Code, Title 28, Section 455
Disqualification of Justice, Judge, or Magistrate
 
(a) Any justice, judge, or magistrate of the United States shall disqualify himself in any proceeding in which his impartiality might reasonably be questioned.

(b) He shall also disqualify himself in the following circumstances:

(1) Where he has a personal bias or prejudice concerning a party, or a personal knowledge of disputed evidentiary facts concerning the proceeding;

(2) Where in private practice he served as lawyer in the matter in controversy, or a lawyer with whom he previously practiced law served during such association as a lawyer has been a material witness concerning it;

(3) Where he has served in governmental employment and in such capacity participated as counsel, adviser or material witness concerning the proceeding or expressed an opinion concerning the merits of the particular case in controversy;

(4) He knows that he, individually or as a fiduciary, or his spouse or minor child residing in his household, has a financial interest in the subject matter in controversy or in a party to the proceeding, or any other interest that could be substantially affected by the outcome of the proceeding;

(5) He or his spouse, or a person within the the third degree of relationship to either of them, or the spouse of such a person:

(i) Is a party to the proceeding, or an officer, director, or trustee of a party;

(ii) Is acting as a lawyer in the proceeding;

(iii) Is known by the judge to have an interest that could be substantially affected by the outcome of the proceeding;

(iv) Is to the judge's knowledge likely to be a material witness in the proceeding.

(v) Serves as an instructor or on an advisory board of an educational institution that is a party to the proceeding.1

(c) A judge should inform himself about his personal and fiduciary financial interests, and make a reasonable effort to inform himself about the personal financial interests of his spouse and minor children residing in his household.

(d) For the purposes of this section, the following words or phrases shall have the meaning indicated:

(1) "proceeding" includes pretrial, trial, appellate review, or other stages of litigation;

(2) the degree of relationship is calculated according to the civil law system;

(3) "fiduciary" includes such relationships as executor, administrator, trustee, and guardian;

(4) "financial interest" means ownership of a legal or equitable interest, however small, or a relationship as director, advisor, or other active participant in the affairs of a party, except that:

(i) Ownership in a mutual or common investment fund that holds securities is not a "financial interest" in such securities unless the judge participates in the management of the fund;

(ii) An office in an educational, religious, charitable, fraternal, or civic organization is not a "financial interest" in securities held by the organization;

(iii) The proprietary interest of a policy holder in a mutual insurance company, of a depositor in a mutual insurance company, of a depositor in a mutual savings association, or a similar proprietary interest, is a "financial interest" in the organization only if the outcome of the proceeding could substantially affect the value of the interest;

(iv) Ownership of government securities is a "financial interest" in the issuer only if the outcome of the proceeding could substantially affect the value of the securities.

(e) No justice, judge, or magistrate shall accept from the parties to the proceeding a waiver of any ground of disqualification enumerated in subsection (b). Where the ground for disqualification arises only under subsection (a), waiver may be accepted provided it is preceded by a full disclosure on the record of the basis for disqualification.

(f) Notwithstanding the preceding provisions of this section, if any justice, judge, magistrate, or bankruptcy judge to whom a matter has been assigned would be disqualified, after substantial judicial time has been devoted to the matter, because of the appearance or discovery, after the matter was assigned to him or her, that he or she individually or as a fiduciary, or his or her spouse or minor child residing in his or her household, has a financial interest in a party (other than an interest that could be substantially affected by the outcome), disqualification is not required if the justice, judge, magistrate, bankruptcy judge, spouse or minor child, as the case may be, divests himself or herself of the interest that provides the grounds for the disqualification.

United States Code Annotated, Title 28, Judiciary and Judicial Procedure, West Publishing Co., St. Paul, MN, 1993, Ch. 21, pp. 656-658.

Footnote

1. Proposed addition to existing legislation that would compel the recusal of adjunct faculty judges from legal proceedings in which the school or university at which they teach is a party. The adoption of §455(b)(5)(v) into the United States Code has been proposed to the Senate Judiciary Committee, American Bar Association, and Administrative Office of the United States Courts.



Other References to Codes of Judicial Conduct

 
Help Balance the Scales of Justice!
 
Help Balance the Scales of Justice!
Censure Judge
Berrigan?
 
Top 

Web site created November, 1998     This section last modified July, 2007
 
|  Home Page  |  Site Map  |  About Bernofsky  |  Curriculum Vitae  |  Lawsuits  |  Case Calendar  |

|  Judicial Misconduct  |  Judicial Reform  |  Contact  |  Interviews  |  Disclaimer  |
 
This Web site is not associated with Tulane University or its affiliates

© 1998-2013 Carl Bernofsky - All rights reserved
Send me an e-mail